School of music
JOHANN SEBASTIAN BACH:
Harpsichord Concerto No. 1 BWV 1052
Exploring Music
Met
Host Bill McGlaughlin guides listeners through a new musical theme each week, devoting five hours to a single topic. McGlaughlin’s in-depth knowledge of and deep passion for classical music gives the series his customary enthusiasm, imagination, and spontaneity. He is a Peabody Award-winning broadcaster, conductor, and composer.
exploring music
Schedule
Weekdays at 9pm

on 89.1 FM and 89.5 FM (southern Utah County)
or online at www.classical89.org/streaming
Program Schedule
July 19
Hidden Gold
On this series of Exploring Music, we examine some works that are absolutely fantastic - every bit as fantastic as the pieces we hear all the time - but relatively unknown by comparison. These works are usually not in the standard repertoire though perhaps should be. Guides to finding some of this hidden treasure are the on-air hosts at WFMT, who have a wealth and depth of knowledge when it comes to unearthing musical gold. This week Bill takes up their claims for greater awareness and appreciation of this music. Playlist information at exploringmusic.wfmt.com.
July 22
Clash of the Titans, Part II
This week Exploring Music profiles three more “divine" beings— Maestros Pierre Monteux (1874-1964), Fritz Reiner (1888-1963), and Serge Koussevitzky (1874-1951): three worldrenowned conductors who seemed to have descended from the Greek gods. After World War I, these conductors settled in America and took on the responsibility of nurturing the artistry of American composers and American orchestras: the native Frenchman Monteux in Boston and then San Francisco; the Hungarian Reiner in Pittsburgh and Chicago; and the Russian Koussevitzky in Boston. The stories of their boundless energy and colorful natures are as legendary as their support of musicians and orchestras. We will listen to music by Stravinsky, Bartok, and Debussy in works that these conductors commissioned and premiered, plus many other compositions all played by "their bands.” Playlist information at exploringmusic.wfmt.com.
July 23
Clash of the Titans, Part II
This week Exploring Music profiles three more “divine" beings— Maestros Pierre Monteux (1874-1964), Fritz Reiner (1888-1963), and Serge Koussevitzky (1874-1951): three worldrenowned conductors who seemed to have descended from the Greek gods. After World War I, these conductors settled in America and took on the responsibility of nurturing the artistry of American composers and American orchestras: the native Frenchman Monteux in Boston and then San Francisco; the Hungarian Reiner in Pittsburgh and Chicago; and the Russian Koussevitzky in Boston. The stories of their boundless energy and colorful natures are as legendary as their support of musicians and orchestras. We will listen to music by Stravinsky, Bartok, and Debussy in works that these conductors commissioned and premiered, plus many other compositions all played by "their bands.” Playlist information at exploringmusic.wfmt.com.
July 24
Clash of the Titans, Part II
This week Exploring Music profiles three more “divine" beings— Maestros Pierre Monteux (1874-1964), Fritz Reiner (1888-1963), and Serge Koussevitzky (1874-1951): three worldrenowned conductors who seemed to have descended from the Greek gods. After World War I, these conductors settled in America and took on the responsibility of nurturing the artistry of American composers and American orchestras: the native Frenchman Monteux in Boston and then San Francisco; the Hungarian Reiner in Pittsburgh and Chicago; and the Russian Koussevitzky in Boston. The stories of their boundless energy and colorful natures are as legendary as their support of musicians and orchestras. We will listen to music by Stravinsky, Bartok, and Debussy in works that these conductors commissioned and premiered, plus many other compositions all played by "their bands.” Playlist information at exploringmusic.wfmt.com.
July 25
Clash of the Titans, Part II
This week Exploring Music profiles three more “divine" beings— Maestros Pierre Monteux (1874-1964), Fritz Reiner (1888-1963), and Serge Koussevitzky (1874-1951): three worldrenowned conductors who seemed to have descended from the Greek gods. After World War I, these conductors settled in America and took on the responsibility of nurturing the artistry of American composers and American orchestras: the native Frenchman Monteux in Boston and then San Francisco; the Hungarian Reiner in Pittsburgh and Chicago; and the Russian Koussevitzky in Boston. The stories of their boundless energy and colorful natures are as legendary as their support of musicians and orchestras. We will listen to music by Stravinsky, Bartok, and Debussy in works that these conductors commissioned and premiered, plus many other compositions all played by "their bands.” Playlist information at exploringmusic.wfmt.com.
July 26
Clash of the Titans, Part II
This week Exploring Music profiles three more “divine" beings— Maestros Pierre Monteux (1874-1964), Fritz Reiner (1888-1963), and Serge Koussevitzky (1874-1951): three worldrenowned conductors who seemed to have descended from the Greek gods. After World War I, these conductors settled in America and took on the responsibility of nurturing the artistry of American composers and American orchestras: the native Frenchman Monteux in Boston and then San Francisco; the Hungarian Reiner in Pittsburgh and Chicago; and the Russian Koussevitzky in Boston. The stories of their boundless energy and colorful natures are as legendary as their support of musicians and orchestras. We will listen to music by Stravinsky, Bartok, and Debussy in works that these conductors commissioned and premiered, plus many other compositions all played by "their bands.” Playlist information at exploringmusic.wfmt.com.
July 29
Bach Sleeps In on Sundays
JS Bach spent most of his life in service to the Lutheran church. And as Bill notes, “Bach family members worked as church musicians from the time of Martin Luther to Otto von Bismarck… nearly 400 years.” Yet JS Bach also wrote wonderful, enduring secular music — especially during a five-year period (1717-22) working for Prince Leopold — when he wrote the cello suites, violin sonatas and partitas, and Brandenburg Concertos. Bill chronicles this intensely creative period in the story of JS Bach. Playlist information at exploringmusic.wfmt.com.
July 30
Bach Sleeps In on Sundays
JS Bach spent most of his life in service to the Lutheran church. And as Bill notes, “Bach family members worked as church musicians from the time of Martin Luther to Otto von Bismarck… nearly 400 years.” Yet JS Bach also wrote wonderful, enduring secular music — especially during a five-year period (1717-22) working for Prince Leopold — when he wrote the cello suites, violin sonatas and partitas, and Brandenburg Concertos. Bill chronicles this intensely creative period in the story of JS Bach. Playlist information at exploringmusic.wfmt.com.
July 31
Bach Sleeps In on Sundays
JS Bach spent most of his life in service to the Lutheran church. And as Bill notes, “Bach family members worked as church musicians from the time of Martin Luther to Otto von Bismarck… nearly 400 years.” Yet JS Bach also wrote wonderful, enduring secular music — especially during a five-year period (1717-22) working for Prince Leopold — when he wrote the cello suites, violin sonatas and partitas, and Brandenburg Concertos. Bill chronicles this intensely creative period in the story of JS Bach. Playlist information at exploringmusic.wfmt.com.
August 1
Bach Sleeps In on Sundays
JS Bach spent most of his life in service to the Lutheran church. And as Bill notes, “Bach family members worked as church musicians from the time of Martin Luther to Otto von Bismarck… nearly 400 years.” Yet JS Bach also wrote wonderful, enduring secular music — especially during a five-year period (1717-22) working for Prince Leopold — when he wrote the cello suites, violin sonatas and partitas, and Brandenburg Concertos. Bill chronicles this intensely creative period in the story of JS Bach. Playlist information at exploringmusic.wfmt.com.