School of music
JOHANN MICHAEL HAYDN:
Trumpet Concerto No. 2
Exploring Music
Met
Host Bill McGlaughlin guides listeners through a new musical theme each week, devoting five hours to a single topic. McGlaughlin’s in-depth knowledge of and deep passion for classical music gives the series his customary enthusiasm, imagination, and spontaneity. He is a Peabody Award-winning broadcaster, conductor, and composer.
exploring music
Schedule
Weekdays at 9pm

on 89.1 FM and 89.5 FM (southern Utah County)
or online at www.classical89.org/streaming
Program Schedule
December 14
Fit for a King
“We’re going to have a ball this week,” Bill says, “listening to some glorious music and, in most cases, giving credit where credit is well due, to the people that commissioned these pieces.” Bill ushers in George I in England, whose favorite composer was Handel— both men were German born, and it’s George I who started the tradition that continues today of standing during the “Hallelujah” Chorus of Messiah. Bill also connects Haydn, Scarlatti, and Walton to their savvy patrons, confirming that if you want to command the finest musicians, it’s good to be the king. Playlist information at exploringmusic.wfmt.com.
December 17
Tudor Music
The House of Tudor reigned from Henry VII through Elizabeth I, and during this time, the arts were loved and supported by church and state alike. This support gave rise to a new type of English secular music, music that was not folk music and didn’t belong to the church. Though the Tudor poets are better known than the composers, the composers have left quite a legacy. On this edition of Exploring Music, we'll listen to William Byrd, Thomas Tallis, and to Henry VIII, who himself wrote a number of pieces! Playlist information at exploringmusic.wfmt.com.
December 18
Tudor Music
The House of Tudor reigned from Henry VII through Elizabeth I, and during this time, the arts were loved and supported by church and state alike. This support gave rise to a new type of English secular music, music that was not folk music and didn’t belong to the church. Though the Tudor poets are better known than the composers, the composers have left quite a legacy. On this edition of Exploring Music, we'll listen to William Byrd, Thomas Tallis, and to Henry VIII, who himself wrote a number of pieces! Playlist information at exploringmusic.wfmt.com.
December 19
Tudor Music
The House of Tudor reigned from Henry VII through Elizabeth I, and during this time, the arts were loved and supported by church and state alike. This support gave rise to a new type of English secular music, music that was not folk music and didn’t belong to the church. Though the Tudor poets are better known than the composers, the composers have left quite a legacy. On this edition of Exploring Music, we'll listen to William Byrd, Thomas Tallis, and to Henry VIII, who himself wrote a number of pieces! Playlist information at exploringmusic.wfmt.com.
December 20
Tudor Music
The House of Tudor reigned from Henry VII through Elizabeth I, and during this time, the arts were loved and supported by church and state alike. This support gave rise to a new type of English secular music, music that was not folk music and didn’t belong to the church. Though the Tudor poets are better known than the composers, the composers have left quite a legacy. On this edition of Exploring Music, we'll listen to William Byrd, Thomas Tallis, and to Henry VIII, who himself wrote a number of pieces! Playlist information at exploringmusic.wfmt.com.
December 21
Tudor Music
The House of Tudor reigned from Henry VII through Elizabeth I, and during this time, the arts were loved and supported by church and state alike. This support gave rise to a new type of English secular music, music that was not folk music and didn’t belong to the church. Though the Tudor poets are better known than the composers, the composers have left quite a legacy. On this edition of Exploring Music, we'll listen to William Byrd, Thomas Tallis, and to Henry VIII, who himself wrote a number of pieces! Playlist information at exploringmusic.wfmt.com.
December 24
Bach Christmas Oratorio
Bill explains the essence, resonance, and imagery in each of Bach’s six cantatas comprising the Christmas Oratorio -- written for the days of the Lutheran church year -- celebrating Christmas to Epiphany with intimate arias and spirited choruses. The Oratorio was first performed in the St. Thomas and St. Nicholas churches in Leipzig, Germany (where he was the “Thomaskantor,” or cantor at St. Thomas) in December, 1734. The cantatas are performed by the Monteverdi Choir & English Baroque Soloists; Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra & Choir; Venice Baroque Orchestra; and Staatskapelle Dresden, respectively. Playlist information at exploringmusic.wfmt.com.
December 25
Bach Christmas Oratorio
Bill explains the essence, resonance, and imagery in each of Bach’s six cantatas comprising the Christmas Oratorio -- written for the days of the Lutheran church year -- celebrating Christmas to Epiphany with intimate arias and spirited choruses. The Oratorio was first performed in the St. Thomas and St. Nicholas churches in Leipzig, Germany (where he was the “Thomaskantor,” or cantor at St. Thomas) in December, 1734. The cantatas are performed by the Monteverdi Choir & English Baroque Soloists; Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra & Choir; Venice Baroque Orchestra; and Staatskapelle Dresden, respectively. Playlist information at exploringmusic.wfmt.com.
December 26
Bach Christmas Oratorio
Bill explains the essence, resonance, and imagery in each of Bach’s six cantatas comprising the Christmas Oratorio -- written for the days of the Lutheran church year -- celebrating Christmas to Epiphany with intimate arias and spirited choruses. The Oratorio was first performed in the St. Thomas and St. Nicholas churches in Leipzig, Germany (where he was the “Thomaskantor,” or cantor at St. Thomas) in December, 1734. The cantatas are performed by the Monteverdi Choir & English Baroque Soloists; Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra & Choir; Venice Baroque Orchestra; and Staatskapelle Dresden, respectively. Playlist information at exploringmusic.wfmt.com.
December 27
Bach Christmas Oratorio
Bill explains the essence, resonance, and imagery in each of Bach’s six cantatas comprising the Christmas Oratorio -- written for the days of the Lutheran church year -- celebrating Christmas to Epiphany with intimate arias and spirited choruses. The Oratorio was first performed in the St. Thomas and St. Nicholas churches in Leipzig, Germany (where he was the “Thomaskantor,” or cantor at St. Thomas) in December, 1734. The cantatas are performed by the Monteverdi Choir & English Baroque Soloists; Amsterdam Baroque Orchestra & Choir; Venice Baroque Orchestra; and Staatskapelle Dresden, respectively. Playlist information at exploringmusic.wfmt.com.